Antique Villas, Temple Tree at Bon Ton

There is only one place in Malaysia that allows you to experience an eclectic mix of architecture, culture and heritage. Imagine being able to escape into a country estate rich in history and tradition. Antique buildings of Chinese, Malay, Indian and Eurasian origins make up this 12-room, 13-suite, and 8-villa hotel.

 

Each building holds over 70–110 years of history. Temple Tree takes great care to give due respect to each family home during the restoration process. The resort continues the stories of the families and the people who used to call these villas their home.

 

Straits Club, Black & White & Colonial House

 

The 90-year-old Eurasian house, now renamed the Straits Club House, welcomes guests to the estate and houses the restaurant, library and bar. From the Straits Club House, the main avenue of trees leads up to a simple temple which is sited around two trees which exist as one. There are two swimming pools, one at 110 ft; both are perfect for early morning lengths.

 

The houses at Temple Tree are made from beautiful old timbers. The owner scoured Malaysia to find these homes, and some of them are transported piece by piece to Langkawi. The interiors are styled with Asian antiques to feel like a private home. Every room tells a unique story.

 

Straits Club House


Straits Club House


This house, originally called “Bahagia”, was from York Road in Penang. Built in the 1920s, it resembles an old colonial building with verandahs and beautiful carvings on the high end of the walls to let the air flow through.

 

Chinese House


Chinese House


Built by a Chinese family in Batu Pahat, it was originally a farmhouse and built approximately 100 years ago. Upstairs accommodates one suite and downstairs another. The decoration of both is very opulent. The Chinese colours of red and black contrast with the simple wooden walls.

 

Penang House


Penang House


This house was originally situated next to busy Gurney Drive in Penang. The original exterior colour has been kept as with the two entrances. The front section is now one suite with one bedroom, living room, a separate TV room, bathroom and massage room. The other suite has a living room, bedroom, separate dressing room and bathroom.

 

Black and White House


Black and white house


This beautiful Malay house was built in the 1940s in Mantin, Negeri Sembilan. It’s a complete house with a living and dining area. The outdoor porch is perfect for writers to start a novel. The house boasts a huge bedroom with wooden bathtub, separate bathroom and adjoining mini gym.

 

Colonial House


Colonial


This large stately house came from Georgetown, Penang. Built by Arabs in the 1920s, rich and had Western taste which shows within the architectural touches such as the cornices, floor tiles and fish scale design canopy over the porch. The huge living space features a bar, dining table for 10 and lounge space.

 

Estate 5


Estate 5


The villa was originally situated in Pasah Puteh, Ipoh. Built in the 1940s, this building was a longhouse for Indian workers on a rubber estate. The villa has been superbly converted into five rooms; each room is decorated with antique terracotta-tiled flooring.

 

Plantation House

 

This double house is originally from a plantation area in Penang. It was known as “Tua Chua”, meaning the big house. It has 5 suites and can be rented as two separate villas.

 

Ipoh House


The lawn of Estate 5

 

Ipoh House, the Grand Dame of the estate, is originally from Ipoh town. This vast house has two parts. One portion was built in 1900 in the Aceh style. The other portion was built in 1903 and features the colonial style of that era.

 

Yellow House

The smallest house in Temple Tree is a typical Malay kampung house from Kulim, Kedah. It is perfectly situated at the end of the pool, and is used as a pool house. A high pitched roof and beautiful carvings make this miniature-style house a total contrast to the other houses on the estate.

 

The Temple Tree at Bon Ton allows you to embark on a journey of Malaysian architectural and cultural history. You can explore the eight different villas, each with its own unique charm, in one venue.


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